Why our brains love arts and crafts

Implications of creative practices on psychophysical well-being

  • Minna Huotilainen University of Helsinki, and Cognitive Brain Research Unit, University of Helsinki
  • Mimmu Rankanen University of the Arts Helsinki
  • Camilla Groth University of Southeast Norway and Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Helsinki
  • Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarainen University of Helsinki
  • Maarit Mäkelä Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Helsinki

Sammendrag

Art and craft practitioners have personal experience of the benefits of making: the handling of material can help to regulate our mental states through providing a means to reach flow states. The mirror neuron system helps in skill learning, and the plasticity of the brain ensures that skills may be learned at all stages of life. Arts and crafts play a role in controlling stress and enhancing relaxation. They also enable us to fail safely and handle our emotions. Furthermore, they facilitate social activity for many individuals who are at risk of social isolation. This article aims to integrate knowledge from both the field of neuroscience and the arts by focusing on the implications that flow experience and the mirror neuron system integral to making processes have on our psychophysical well-being.

Forfatterbiografier

Minna Huotilainen, University of Helsinki, and Cognitive Brain Research Unit, University of Helsinki

Professor of Educational Sciences

Mimmu Rankanen, University of the Arts Helsinki

Postdoctoral researcher, Center for Educational Research and Academic Development in the Arts (CERADA)

Camilla Groth, University of Southeast Norway and Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Helsinki

Associate Professor II in Art and Craft,  Department of Visual and Performing Arts Education,
University of Southeast Norway

and Postdoc researcher at Fashion / Textile Futures Research Group, Department of Design, 
School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University

Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarainen, University of Helsinki

Professor of Craft Studies

Maarit Mäkelä, Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Helsinki

Associate professor of Practice-led Research

Publisert
2018-02-12
Hvordan referere
Huotilainen, M., Rankanen, M., Groth, C., Seitamaa-Hakkarainen, P., & Mäkelä, M. (2018). Why our brains love arts and crafts. Form Akademisk - Forskningstidsskrift for Design Og Designdidaktikk, 11(2). https://doi.org/10.7577/formakademisk.1908